Apr 08, 2020
The Real Tadzio: Thomas Mann's Death in Venice and the Boy Who Inspired It
Posted by Gilbert Adair

In the summer of 1911, the German writer Thomas Mann visited Venice in the company of his wife Katia There, in the Grand Hotel des Bains, as he waited for the dinner gong to ring, the author s roving eye was drawn to a nearby Polish family, the Moeses, consisting of a mother, three daughters, and a young sailor suited son who, to Mann, exuded an almost supernatural beautyIn the summer of 1911, the German writer Thomas Mann visited Venice in the company of his wife Katia There, in the Grand Hotel des Bains, as he waited for the dinner gong to ring, the author s roving eye was drawn to a nearby Polish family, the Moeses, consisting of a mother, three daughters, and a young sailor suited son who, to Mann, exuded an almost supernatural beauty and grace Inspired by this glancing encounter with the luminous child, Mann wrote Death in Venice, and the infatuated writer made of that boy, Wladyslaw Moes, one of the twentieth century s most potent and enduring icons According to Gilbert Adair in his sparkling evocation of that idyll on the Adriatic, Mann wrote his novella, as though taking dictation from God But precisely who was the boy And what was his reaction to the publication of Death in Venice in 1912 and, later, the release of Luchino Visconti s film adaptation in 1971 In this revealing portrait, including telling photographs, Gilbert Adair brilliantly juxtaposes the life of Wladyslaw Moes with that of his mythic twin, Tadzio It is a fascinating account of a man who was immortalized by a genius, yet forgotten by history.

  • Title: The Real Tadzio: Thomas Mann's Death in Venice and the Boy Who Inspired It
  • Author: Gilbert Adair
  • ISBN: 9780786712472
  • Page: 366
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Real Tadzio Thomas Mann s Death in Venice and the Boy Who Inspired It In the summer of the German writer Thomas Mann visited Venice in the company of his wife Katia There in the Grand Hotel des Bains as he waited for the dinner gong to ring the author s roving

    Louise

    This short book gives something of the life of Wladyslaw Moes, the model for Thomas Mann's Tadzio in his classic novella: "Death in Venice". It also tells of his friend Jaschiu Fudakowski who is also described in the famous work. The sources seem to be Wladyslaw's daughter and Fudakowski's son.The two were more or less stumbled upon by a novelist on his holiday in Venice. In this randomness they can be said to stand as proxy for their fellow aristocrats and how they fared in the forces of histor [...]


    Edmund Marlowe

    Who was really Mann's boy?Until Thomas Mann's diaries were posthumously published, it was not well known that he was a pederast, a lover of adolescent boys, or that his most famous work, Death in Venice, was almost autobiographical; in his own words, "nothing was invented." So who was the boy "Tadzio" with whom he fell in love in Venice in the summer of 1911?In 1964, an elderly Pole named Wladyslaw Moes came forward to the Polish translator of the novella and said "I am that boy!" So far as I ca [...]


    Jacques Coulardeau

    This short novel by Thomas Mann has become a classic on its own merit first and then because he has been adapted to the cinema and the stage quite many times. The best known adaptations are Visconti’s film in 1971 and the opera by Benjamin Britten in 1973. This book was also written at the end of Thomas Mann’s life and though it cannot really be said to be autobiographical, which anyway has no value to discuss and appreciate it, it is obvious that Thomas Mann has had that kind of experience [...]


    Brendan

    It’s remarkable for any author to so successfully map out that always-elusive intersection of great art and the very creepy love of an old man for a young boy. That Thomas Mann accomplished this feat way back in 1912 with Death in Venice, that he required a mere 79 pages to do it, and that he managed to wrap the whole thing up with the gorgeous image of said young boy on a beach, peering back toward the shore, toward said old man, who is reclining on his chair, who is slowly dying, who is floa [...]


    Trisha

    worth reading. Beyond disturbing to know that Mann was lusting after a 10yr old. Don't want to go there in my mind. Prefer to see it as his appreciation of unspoiled purity but. one let that affect one's opinion of an artist? Or do you just experience and evaluate the work of art? Compelling arugument for New School criticism. Staggering to think how people had everything taken from them that they had earned themselves. His family had moved from Westphalia to Poland only to have the communists t [...]



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      366 Gilbert Adair
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      Posted by:Gilbert Adair
      Published :2020-01-26T09:52:20+00:00